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What is this?!

Glycerin is a TV series in development about a way-past-his-prime small-town punk rocker decides to get his old band back together, to the excitement of absolutely no one.

Details

Genre: Dramedy Original script Format: 8 x 30’
Creators: Miloš Pušić, Ivan Knežević
Writers: Ivan Knežević, Miloš Pušić
Director: Miloš Pušić
Producers: Miloš Pušić, Ivan Knežević

Ilustration:: Miroslav Kostic

 

Synopsis

JOE, a washed-up punk rocker nearing forty, works as a delivery man. Burnt out, despondent and embittered, he half-asses his job and life with no ambition at all. He reminisces about the glory days of his forgotten and obscure band Glycerin, and desperately longs for a piece of long overdue fame. With most of his friends having moved on to functional adult lives, Joe spends his days mostly alone, going to punk gigs and arguing on the internet about what makes real punk, and who sold out to corporate interests and capitalism. The sole ray of light in his life is his six-year-old daughter MILICA, born from a previous relationship. After a chance encounter with a lone fan, Joe gets a recording of the band he didn’t even know existed. Reinvigorated by nostalgia, he decides to put the band back together. 

Creators’ statement

The town we grew in had its very own and very specific punk scene. A scene which had a lot of people who thought of themselves as the second coming of music. Being outside that world, those people, their conflicts and dramas on facebook and youtube made us laugh. A very self-serious attitude in something that shouldn’t be serious at all. Glycerin began at least three years ago as a very derisive and mean-spirited send-off of people like that. But as it happens, working further on the characters made them a lot different, added dimensions and idiosyncrasies and made us actually love them, care for them and made us want them to succeed. What we’d like Glycerin to be is a series about typical underdogs whose life and pursuits are made more difficult chiefly because of themselves, and only then the world around them.